Category: Assessment & Badges

  • 5 Habits for Intending Students to Succeed in 2022

    5 Habits for Intending Students to Succeed in 2022

    After graduation from high school, I had no idea what I would do in college. Sure enough, I chose subjects, went to lectures, and got ready for exams. But I didn’t understand how to organize the process to grow my academic productivity while my stress would decrease. It took me two years to make changes and succeed […]

  • An Activity to Put a Stop to “Students Don’t Read My Comments on their Papers”

    An Activity to Put a Stop to “Students Don’t Read My Comments on their Papers”

    As a composition instructor, one of the complaints I hear most often among colleagues (and I’ve definitely said this myself) goes something like this: “Students don’t read my comments on their papers.” It feels like such a waste of time when this happens–and that is frustrating–but it also means, in my view, that we are doing […]

  • Scaffolding the Skills to Build an Anti-racist Future: How to Use a “Navigational Log” in the Literature Classroom

    Scaffolding the Skills to Build an Anti-racist Future: How to Use a “Navigational Log” in the Literature Classroom

    Image description: a row of texts I’ve assigned in my literature courses related to human rights, transnational American literature, migration, and Chicanx studies. This blog post provides a detailed account of how I implement the “Navigational Log” in my courses to scaffold the skills of close reading, critical thinking and reflection, listening, and dialogue. It builds […]

  • (Re)Becoming the Gatekeeper (sort of)

    (Re)Becoming the Gatekeeper (sort of)

    Circling around the experience of that fishbowl discussion (see “Naming the Elephant”) was my feeling of both arrival and not-quite-there-yet.  Over the course of that hour-long fishbowl, my students stopped looking at me for validation and eventually forgot I was there.  Sounds like a strange thing to wish for in your own classroom, but it […]

  • Transforming on the Fly: One Model for Easy Synchronous Community in an Online Class

    Transforming on the Fly: One Model for Easy Synchronous Community in an Online Class

    Here is how we switched up what we are doing in class tomorrow.  Not every student can be on video (in fact, I’ve not had any luck getting on), so we have divided up our two-hour class, so the first hour is asynchronous and the second synchronous in a variety of relatively easy forms–video, conference […]

  • Making the Most of Student Participation using Surveys with Ms. Paula Patch

    Making the Most of Student Participation using Surveys with Ms. Paula Patch

    Ms. Paula Patch is a Senior Lecturer in English and Assistant Director for First-Year Initiatives at Elon University, where she previously coordinated the first-year writing program and has taught composition and grammar courses since 2006. She currently teaches First-year writing, first-year seminar, literature for non-majors. In all her classrooms, Ms. Patch makes use of surveys. […]

  • Constructing Models of Student Well-being with Dr. Soutter Horton

    Constructing Models of Student Well-being with Dr. Soutter Horton

    In the Progressive Pedagogy group, we recognize superb, innovative educators and their classroom innovations. Today, we feature Dr. Annie Soutter Horton at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, who tells us about her research, classroom innovations, and collaboration with Professor Billy Osteen. Dr. Soutter Horton graduated from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in Psychology and […]

  • Preparing for Public Facing Writing in the Composition Classroom with Professor Johnson

    Preparing for Public Facing Writing in the Composition Classroom with Professor Johnson

    In HASTAC’s Progressive Pedagogy group, we share innovative teaching strategies and activities happening across higher education. Our commitment to public-facing work is shared by Professor Leslie C. Johnson at Lansing Community College where she teaches Composition I and II. In her Composition II classroom, Professor Johnson has students practice the genre of academic essay and […]

  • Reimagining the Grading Contract to “Ungrade” with Prof. Eidum

    Reimagining the Grading Contract to “Ungrade” with Prof. Eidum

    We are thankful this week on Progressive Pedagogy to have Professor Jennifer Eidum (EYE-dum), Assistant Professor of English at Elon University, North Carolina share her collected resources on reimagining the grading contract to move towards “ungrading.” Professor Eidum’s teaching focuses on first-year writing, teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), and sociolinguistics. She uses […]

  • Dr. Jenn Polish on Accessible Syllabus Design: Content, Assignments, Assessments, and More

    Dr. Jenn Polish on Accessible Syllabus Design: Content, Assignments, Assessments, and More

    Syllabus accessibility isn’t emphasized enough in academe. Too often, accessibility is limited to a single statement toward the end of the syllabus rather than something that is integrated into a course from the beginning stages of syllabus design. Dr. Jenn Polish asks, “What would happen if we structured our syllabus to foreground accessibility, rather than […]